Samos YoungArtists Festival

As of 20th July 2013

Slavs and Tatars

Long Legged Linguistics

The Slavs and Tatars collective was founded in 2006. It sees itself as a "faction of polemics and intimacy", an artistic association that occupies itself "with the area east of the former Berlin Wall and west of the Great Wall of China known as Eurasia". The collective's artistic practices do not only extend over the numerous areas and geographical regions in this large space, but also include a wide variety of media, disciplines and formats, thereby covering a broad spectrum of different cultural existences. The focus of their work lies on the diverse intersections between Slavic, Caucasian and Central Asian influences. In their primarily research-based works, Slavs and Tatars deal with such topics as antiquity and the past or the marginal and often forgotten. They poetically and very effectively highlight the results of their research. Language is always a central element of their work.

Language is also the initial point for Slavs and Tatars' new work cycle Long Legged Linguistics, which premieres in the Art Space Pythagorion. Language serves both as a creator of personal identity as well as a communicative aid for understanding others. It can, however, be used as a method of concealment. It can clarify as well as manipulate; it is seductive and dazzling and never entirely clear. Above all, language can help overcome intellectual, cultural and national borders. Samos, as the junction between the Orient and the Occident, provides the special political and geographical circumstances that offer the ideal framework for Long Legged Linguistics.

The exhibition will approach the topic of language in a performative manner. Playfully and clearly, the sculptures and installations of this work involve the viewer in a tangle of symbols, meanings and allusions. The exhibit does not place the rational capabilities of language in the foreground, however, but much more its subtler elements such as humor, travesty or parody, whose potential is often hidden behind what is ostensibly said.

Photo above: Reverse Joy, 2012. “Projects 98,” Museum of Modern Art, New York.